A Guide for Parents and Campers

Important Dates | A Guide for Parents and Campers | Camper Forms | Health and Medical
Clothing and Packing | Baggage and Transportation | Visiting Camp
Staying Connected to Camp and Your Camper | Camp Policies | Extras

Going away from home for an extended period of time is difficult for many children. It is natural for them to have a certain amount of reluctance, as the moment of parting from parents, siblings and friends grows closer. Some will carry these concerns to camp. It is with this in mind that we have written this guide for parents. The pointers below are designed to help you, help us, prepare your child for the enriching and fruitful experience that camp provides.

AT HOME

  • If your child exhibits concerns about going to camp, encourage the open expression of feelings. They are worried about the total unknown and are looking for your understanding. At this point it is helpful to tell your child that these concerns are normal and natural.  Many campers feel the same way. Permit your child to call the camp office to ask questions and receive reassurance. Let them know that the camp directors are always available to help in any way they might be able.

 

  • Under no circumstances be ambivalent about your child’s stay at camp. Your child is there for the pre-­‐determined length of stay and they should understand this. It is important, in this day and age, that a camper understands this commitment and is not encouraged to leave something unfinished. A “try it out” approach does not work. Although it might satisfy children at home it is certain to create a serious problem at camp. Remember, fees are not returnable for early departure.

 

  • Reassure your child that everything at home will be the same as when they left. This means that pets will be cared for, possessions will be protected from siblings, and that their room will stay as it was left. If for any reason this cannot be promised, inform the office of the circumstances – we can be most helpful when we are informed.

 

  • Please notify the office of any upsetting event that may have occurred prior to camp or is to occur during the summer. In this category would be an illness or death in the family, poor school grades, divorce, or moving to a new house or city.

 

  • When seeing your child off on the bus, or dropping them off at camp, make your parting brief and pleasant. Prolonged good-­‐byes and abundant tears will be emotionally upsetting to your child.  The same procedure should hold for visiting day at camp.

 

  • Please discuss with the camp directors if your child has been under any psychological/psychiatric care at any time prior to camp. Iroquois Springs is more than adequately prepared to deal with most children and the common problems of growing up. Our knowledge of the facts will give your child the best chance of success.

 

  • Please tell us if your child has any special interests or talents that should be encouraged at camp. While the camp program is designed to provide basic skills in many activities, certain children may have a more rewarding summer if encouraged in a specific area.

Introduction | Important Dates | A Guide for Parents and Campers | Camper Forms | Health and Medical
Clothing and Packing | Baggage and Transportation | Visiting Camp
Staying Connected to Camp and Your Camper | Camp Policies | Extras